Fentanyl is a Major Cause of Increase in Heroin-Related Deaths

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Half of the increase in deaths involving heroin after 2013 can be attributed to heroin mixed with fentanyl, according to a new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

About 33,000 people died of an opioid overdose in the United States in 2015, HealthDay reports.

Opioid overdoses accounted for 63 percent of drug overdose deaths in the United States that year. Between 2010 and 2015, heroin overdose deaths quadrupled, from 3,036 to 12,989.

A second study by the CDC found about 90 percent of overdose deaths in Ohio early this year involved fentanyl or a chemically related substance. Only 6 percent involved heroin.

Young Men and Women’s Brains DO Not Function the Same after Heavy Alcohol Use

According to a recent article in Science Daily, Scientists have found that brain functions in young men and women are changed by long-term alcohol use, but that these changes are significantly different in men and women.

This indicates not only that young people might be at increased risk of long-term harm from alcohol use, but also that the risks are probably different in men and in women, with men possibly more at risk.

The article notes that the scientists have found that brain functions in young men and women are changed by long-term alcohol use, but that these changes are significantly different in men and women.

This indicates not only that young people might be at increased risk of long-term harm from alcohol use, but also that the risks are probably different in men and in women, with men possibly more at risk.
Previously, the researchers had found that heavy alcohol users showed a greater electrical response in the cortex of the brain than non-alcohol users, which indicates that there had been long-term changes to how the brain responds. This time, they found that young men and young women responded differently, with males showing a greater increase in electrical activity in the brain in response to a TMS pulse.

Source Science Daily

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