ADHD Medications Don’t Appear to Help Children With Homework

ADHD Medications Don’t Appear to Help Children With Homework
Giving children stimulant medication meant to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has no significant effect on homework completion or accuracy, a new small study suggests. The study, published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, included 75 children with ADHD who were attending a summer school program. The children received either behavioral treatment with daily report cards and parent coaching, or a long-acting stimulant, Reuters reports. Children who received behavioral treatment got 10 to 13 percent more homework problems finished, and completed 8 percent more problems accurately, compared with children who did not receive the treatment. The authors said this translates into the difference between getting an average grade of C with behavioral help, compared with an average grade of F without such help.
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
291 Hits

ADHD Treatment Linked to Lower Risk of Substance Use Disorder

ADHD Treatment Linked to Lower Risk of Substance Use Disorder
Children and teens who are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and take medication for the condition are less likely to have a substance use disorder than youth with ADHD who don’t take medication, a new study finds. Researchers at Princeton University found children and teens with ADHD who received medication were 7.3 percent less likely to have a substance use disorder. They also were 3.6 percent less likely to contract a sexually transmitted disease and 2.3 percent less likely to be injured, HealthDay reports. The findings are published in Labour Economics. Study co-author Anna Chorniy said young people with ADHD tend to have problems with self control, which can lead to injury and engaging in risky behaviors.
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
438 Hits

College Students in Study Who Misused Stimulants More Likely to Have ADHD

College Students in Study Who Misused Stimulants More Likely to Have ADHD
A new study finds college students who misuse prescription stimulants are more likely to have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), compared with students not misusing stimulants. UPI reports students who misused stimulants also were more likely to have conduct disorder or substance use disorder. The findings are published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. “We know that untreated ADHD is associated with increased risk of alcohol- and drug-use disorders, so it is not surprising that we found high rates of co-occurring ADHD and of stimulant-use and overall substance-use disorders in those misusing stimulants,” Dr. Timothy Wilens, Chief of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, said in a press release.
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
572 Hits

Too Many Young Children With ADHD Receiving Medicine as First Treatment: Report

Too Many Young Children With ADHD Receiving Medicine as First Treatment: Report
Too many children ages 2 to 5 who are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are receiving medication as the first treatment, before behavioral therapy is tried, a new government report states. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says about 75 percent of young children with ADHD receive medicine as treatment, the Associated Press reports. Only about half of young children with ADHD in Medicaid and 40 percent with employer-sponsored insurance receive psychological services, including the recommended first-line treatment, behavior therapy. Behavior therapy improves ADHD symptoms without the side effects of medicine, the CDC notes. “ It is an important first step for young children with ADHD and most effective when delivered by parents,” the report notes. “With the support of healthcare providers and therapists, parents can learn specific ways to improve their child’s behavior and keep their relationships strong.” Behavior therapy involves a therapist teaching parents over...
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
1300 Hits

Almost 90 Percent of Teens Who Abuse ADHD Drugs Use Someone Else’s Medication

Almost 90 Percent of Teens Who Abuse ADHD Drugs Use Someone Else’s Medication
A study of teens finds almost 90 percent of those who abuse medications for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) say they used someone else’s medication. The study included more than 11,000 American children and teens ages 10 to 18, who were interviewed between 2008 and 2011. The researchers found seven percent said they had used a prescription stimulant drug in the past month, and more than half said their use of the drug was non-medical, HealthDay reports. Non-medical use included taking more pills than prescribed by their doctor, using someone else’s medication, or smoking, snorting or sniffing the medication instead of taking it orally. Using someone else’s medication was the most frequently reported form of misuse, at 88 percent, the researchers wrote in Drug and Alcohol Dependence. The study found 39 percent took more medication than prescribed. “It is so important for physicians and parents to counsel youth who have prescription...
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
1741 Hits

Nonmedical Use of Adderall on the Rise Among Young Adults

Nonmedical Use of Adderall on the Rise Among Young Adults
Nonmedical use of Adderall, a medication used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), rose 67 percent among young adults between 2006 and 2011, a new study finds. The number of emergency room visits involving misuse of the drug among 18- to 25-year-olds also rose during this period, NPR reports. The number of ER visits related to Adderall among this age group rose from 862 visits in 2006 to 1,489 in 2011. During this period the number of prescriptions for the drug remained unchanged among young adults. ER visits associated with the ADHD drug Ritalin rose only slightly among young adults between 2006 and 2011, the researchers found. Nonmedical use of Ritalin was much lower than misuse of Adderall. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health said in many cases, young adults who misuse ADHD drugs get them from a friend or family member who has been prescribed...
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
1649 Hits

ADHD Diagnoses Increase, With Largest Leap in Girls and Hispanic Children

ADHD Diagnoses Increase, With Largest Leap in Girls and Hispanic Children
The number of U.S. children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is on the rise, with the largest increase seen in girls and Hispanic children, according to a new study. The rate of ADHD among children ages 5 to 17 increased 43 percent from 2003 to 2011, HealthDay reports. In 2011, an estimated 12 percent of American children had ever been diagnosed with ADHD, researchers from George Washington University found. The study found ADHD is still almost twice as common among white children compared with Hispanic children (14 percent versus less than 8 percent). Between 2003 and 2011, ADHD diagnoses increased 83 percent among Hispanic children, compared with 46 percent among white children. While twice as many boys were diagnosed with ADHD compared with girls, the prevalence among girls rose 55 percent during the study period, from 4.3 percent in 2003 to 7.5 percent in 2011. The findings are published in...
Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
1689 Hits
0 Comments

Study Links Taking ADHD Medication with Being Bullied at School

Study Links Taking ADHD Medication with Being Bullied at School
A new study finds children who take stimulants to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely to be bullied at school than their peers who do not have attention disorders. Those who have ever shared their prescriptions are at highest risk of bullying, Time reports. Children who had shared their medication or had it taken from them in the previous year were four-and-a-half times more likely to be frequently bullied. The findings come from a survey of almost 5,000 children in five public schools. “We know that among adolescents in the U.S., prescription stimulants are some of the most misused and shared diverted and drugs,” said lead researcher Quyen Epstein-Ngo of the University of Michigan. “We also know that bullying is a real issue. There was some research that suggested that kids were having their medication stolen or were being coerced into giving it away.” The prevalence of children ages...
Tags:
Rate this blog entry:
Continue reading
2576 Hits
0 Comments