Heavy Drinkers Helped With Very Brief Mindfulness Training

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Very brief mindfulness training could help heavy drinkers to start cutting back. So concludes a new study that found that as little as 11 minutes of mindfulness training helped heavy drinkers to reduce their alcohol intake in the following week. An article in Medical News Today announced that researchers from University College London (UCL) in the United Kingdom ran an experiment that compared the effect of "ultra-brief" mindfulness training against relaxation training (the controls). Lead author Dr. Sunjeev Kamboj, deputy director of the Clinical Psychopharmacology Unit at UCL, says, "We found that a very brief, simple exercise in mindfulness can help drinkers cut back, and the benefits can be seen quite quickly." Writing in the International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, he and his colleagues explain that in recent years, there has been much interest in incorporating mindfulness training into psychological treatments for addiction. Mindfulness training teaches people to heighten their "moment-to-moment...
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Drug to Treat Alcohol Use Disorder Shows Promise among Drinkers with High Stress

Drug to Treat Alcohol Use Disorder Shows Promise among Drinkers with High Stress
NIH-funded multi-site clinical trial suggests that smokers may also benefit A new medication that targets part of the brain's stress system may help reduce alcohol use in people with alcohol use disorder (AUD), according to a new study by researchers at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), part of the National Institutes of Health. "Medications have become an important tool for treating alcohol use disorders, but current medications are not effective for all people with AUDs," noted NIAAA Director George F. Koob, Ph.D. "We're committed to developing new medications to provide effective therapy to a broader spectrum of people with AUDs." As reported online in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, researchers led by Raye Litten, Ph.D., acting director of the NIAAA Division of Medications Development, conducted a randomized clinical trial of a new compound, called ABT-436, designed to block the effects of vasopressin, a neuropeptide produced in the hypothalamus...
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