Recovery Month 2017 is Around the Corner

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  National Recovery Month (Recovery Month) is an observance held every September to educate Americans that substance use treatment and mental health services can enable those with a mental and/or substance use disorder to live a healthy and rewarding life. The theme for Recovery Month 2017 is Join the Voices for Recovery: Strengthen Families and Communities and is intended to highlight the value of family and community support throughout recovery and to invite individuals in recovery and their family members to share their personal stories and successes in order to encourage others. Recovery Month celebrates the gains made by those in recovery, just as we celebrate health improvements made by those who are managing other health conditions such as hypertension, diabetes, asthma, and heart disease. The observance reinforces the positive message that behavioral health is essential to overall health, prevention works, treatment is effective, and people can and do recover....
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Addiction Treatment Mandate Would be Dropped Under Republican Healthcare Plan

Addiction Treatment Mandate Would be Dropped Under Republican Healthcare Plan
The Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act would eliminate a requirement that Medicaid cover basic addiction and mental health services in states that expanded the government healthcare program, The Washington Post reports. Almost 1.3 million people receive treatment for addiction and mental health disorders under Medicaid expansion. Under the proposed plan, states that expanded Medicaid would be allowed to decide whether to include addiction and mental health services starting in 2020. Many states that could eliminate these services include ones hardest hit by the opioid crisis, including Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia, the article notes. “Taken as a whole, it is a major retreat from the effort to save lives in the opiate epidemic,” said Joshua Sharfstein, Associate Dean at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
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