South Carolina Partners with Law Enforcement on Naloxone Program

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State prevention leaders joined forces with local police departments to create an effective naloxone training, distribution, and monitoring program. On June 3, 2015, then Governor Nikki Haley signed the South Carolina Overdose Prevention Act into law, increasing medical professionals' access to the anti-overdose drug naloxone and authorizing first responders, including firefighters and police officers, to carry and administer it.1,2 The need to expand the safe use of this life-saving medication was urgent. In 2015, 468 people in South Carolina had died from opioid-related overdoses, up from 453 deaths the previous year.3 Police involvement in administering naloxone was critical, as police officers were frequently first on the scene of many overdoses. "Many of our counties are very rural. It takes anywhere from six to eight minutes for an ambulance to respond to a 911 call, whereas law enforcement typically responds in four minutes or less," says Michelle Nienhius, Prevention Manager for...
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Police Programs Focusing on Treatment Over Jail May Lose Support Under Trump

Police Programs Focusing on Treatment Over Jail May Lose Support Under Trump
Police organizations promoting an approach to opioids that emphasizes treatment over jail are concerned the incoming Trump Administration may focus on prosecution rather than treatment, Scientific American reports. So-called ANGEL programs, which started in Gloucester, Massachusetts in 2015, have been expanded to hundreds of police departments nationwide. The Obama Administration has supported the programs, the article notes. Comments from Senator Jeff Sessions, the nominee for Attorney General, indicate the incoming administration may focus first on reducing the supply of illegal drugs coming in from Mexico. In December, researchers reported in the New England Journal of Medicine that between June 2015 and May 2016, 94.5 percent of the 376 people seeking help through Gloucester’s ANGEL program were offered placement in a detox or treatment program, and 89.7 percent enrolled. Lead researcher Davida Schiff of Boston Medical Center said in order for police-led treatment referral programs to be successful, more treatment facilities...
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Facing Addiction and The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) are proud to announce the merger of our organizations – creating a national leader in turning the tide on the addiction epidemic.
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