Increase in Street Drug Laced With Bug Spray Reported in Indiana

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Indianapolis authorities are reporting an increase in overdoses of a street drug known as KD, which is laced with bug spray. The drug produces zombie-like effects, according to U.S. News & World Report. People are creating the drug by spraying heavy-duty bug sprays such as Raid, which have high concentrations of pesticides called pyrethroids, on substances such as marijuana and tobacco. KD is highly addictive, and even a small dose can be dangerous, the authorities warn. The drug can cause the inability to walk, breathe or speak. People using the drug appear to be in a catatonic state, the article notes. Dr. Daniel Rusyniak of the Indiana Poison Center told WRTV-TV a big concern about KD is the easy accessibility of bug spray. “They no longer have to drive to a shady street corner,” he said. “They can get on the internet and they can order this and it can...
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Series of Overdoses in Georgia Traced Back to Fake Percocet Pills

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Officials in Georgia say at least a dozen people were hospitalized over two days in the state after ingesting an unidentified street drug. Four deaths have been linked to the drug. CNN reports some patients said they took a yellow pill they thought was the prescription painkiller Percocet. According to a news release from the Sheriff’s Office of Bibb County, Georgia, the counterfeit pills have the numbers 10/325 on one side and the word PERCOCET in all capital letters on the opposite side. “On the counterfeit pills the word PERCOCET is not stamped as deep as the manufacturer typically does on their pills. Also on the counterfeit pills, the imprint of the name is also at an angle.”
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Street Drug Combining Fentanyl and New Synthetic Opioid Poses Danger

Street Drug Combining Fentanyl and New Synthetic Opioid Poses Danger
A street drug that combines fentanyl and a new synthetic opioid is being sold illegally as the prescription painkiller Norco, according to a new report. Researchers caution that the street version is much stronger and more hazardous than the real medication. The illegal version of Norco looks very similar to brand-name Norco, according to Dr. Patil Armenian of the University of California, San Francisco. She reported the case of a woman who took the illegal version of Norco in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. Legal Norco contains acetaminophen and hydrocodone, HealthDay reports. The illegal version has led to an unexpected cluster of fentanyl deaths in California this spring, Armenian said.
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Facing Addiction and The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) are proud to announce the merger of our organizations – creating a national leader in turning the tide on the addiction epidemic.
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