Teens at Elite High Schools May Face Increased Addiction Risk as Young Adults

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Teens who attend elite high schools may face an increased risk of addiction as young adults compared with national norms, a new study suggests. Researchers assessed more than 500 students from affluent communities starting when they were high school seniors through age 27. They found rates of addiction to drugs or alcohol among 19 to 24 percent of women by age 26—three times the national average—and 23 to 40 percent among men—twice the national average. The researchers said possible reasons for the increased addiction rate include pressure to succeed, having the money needed to buy drugs, alcohol and high-quality fake IDs, widespread peer approval of substance use, and parents’ lack of awareness, HealthDa y reports. “Paradoxical though it may seem, these ostensibly privileged youth, many of who start experimenting early and often with drinking and drugs, could well be among the groups at highest risk for alcoholism and addiction in...
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Heroin Hearse Brings Addiction Awareness to County

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The Heroin Hearse treks across interstates from its home-base in Huntington, West Virginia into eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania, delivering a fiercely frank message on the tailgate: “Heroin Kills, is this your last ride?” In May 2016, a 6-year-old boy strapped inside a hot vehicle, his father passed out from an overdose, compelled Dwayne Woods to act. “I’ll never forget that child (Kenny) as his arms wrapped around my neck and his tears running down my back,” Woods said. “We’re advocates for children, we’re getting the word out.” He saved the child and today the Heroin Hearse, owned by Woods, roams the streets, collecting teddy bears to give to children in a new “Bears for Kenny” project. Last February, he bought a 1988 Buick hearse with the intent of cutting off the top and hauling motorcycles in it – then he heard a reports of drug overdoses. With his partner,...
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Unemployment and Addiction

Unemployment and Addiction
One of the major themes of the 2016 presidential election was employment. The issue of high unemployment in certain areas of the country rose to national prominence and President Trump promised to bring jobs to these communities. Various causes were cited for unemployment, including globalization, trade agreements, technology, and regulations. Yet there was one contributing factor that was not discussed: addiction. How are addiction and unemployment related? Late last year, Alan Krueger, an economist, published Where Have All the Workers Gone? This paper found that a large number of unemployed men of working age were taking prescription opioids. While the paper did not examine rates of substance use disorders, it is likely that there are higher rates of opioid addiction among this population. Addiction frequently prevents individuals from participating in active employment. In fact, untreated addiction creates a tremendous drag on the economy. If creating more jobs and improving the...
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Addiction Treatment Mandate Would be Dropped Under Republican Healthcare Plan

Addiction Treatment Mandate Would be Dropped Under Republican Healthcare Plan
The Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act would eliminate a requirement that Medicaid cover basic addiction and mental health services in states that expanded the government healthcare program, The Washington Post reports. Almost 1.3 million people receive treatment for addiction and mental health disorders under Medicaid expansion. Under the proposed plan, states that expanded Medicaid would be allowed to decide whether to include addiction and mental health services starting in 2020. Many states that could eliminate these services include ones hardest hit by the opioid crisis, including Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia, the article notes. “Taken as a whole, it is a major retreat from the effort to save lives in the opiate epidemic,” said Joshua Sharfstein, Associate Dean at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
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The Devastating Impact of Addiction in Rural America and What’s Being Done About It

The Devastating Impact of Addiction in Rural America and What’s Being Done About It
Note: The following is based on a story published in The Buzz, a publication of The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) Recently, news stories have focused on how addiction is ravaging families and communities, particularly in rural areas. Around one in five Americans lives in a rural area, defined as a community with fewer than 2,500 people. Rural and urban communities both face the challenges of substance use, overdose, and the opioid epidemic. Although substance use rates in rural areas have kept pace with those in urban areas, rural communities seem to have been hit harder. For example, a recent statistic shows a greater increase in the proportion of babies born addicted to opioids in rural communities than in urban areas. Why do rural communities seem to be disproportionately affected by addiction? Rural communities have been especially affected in the past few years by rising rates of...
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Opioid Epidemic Stigma Perpetuated by Social Media

Opioid Epidemic Stigma Perpetuated by Social Media
You’ve seen them. The exposure of devastating images of addiction, especially photos and videos of people overdosing or near-death, sometimes with their children nearby. In some instances, the posted or shared pictures and videos were posted by law enforcement or first responders. Questions have been raised as to why it is acceptable to post images that feature people with addiction. People are questioning whether the same situation would arise if people were found to be in medical emergency situations that involve a diabetic, or asthma. It is acceptable for a bystander to post similar images on social media too? According to Samuel A. Ball, PhD,President and CEO of The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse, the stigma of addiction will remain strong because some of its symptoms result in real risk or harm to others. But more of the stigma of addiction, which is also true of obesity, comes...
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Surgeon General Issues Landmark Report on Alcohol, Drugs and Health

Surgeon General Issues Landmark Report on Alcohol, Drugs and Health
A new Surgeon General’s report finds alcohol and drug misuse and severe substance use disorders, commonly called addiction, to be one of America’s most pressing public health concerns. Nearly 21 million Americans – more than the number of people who have all cancers combined – suffer from substance use disorders. The report, Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, marks the first time a U.S. Surgeon General has dedicated a report to substance misuse and related disorders. The report addresses alcohol, illicit drugs, and prescription drug misuse, with chapters dedicated to neurobiology, prevention, treatment, recovery, health systems integration and recommendations for the future. It provides an in-depth look at the science of substance use disorders and addiction, calls for a cultural shift in the way Americans talk about the issue, and recommends actions we can take to prevent and treat these conditions, and promote...
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Addiction a Chronic Disease of the Brain, Not a Character Flaw: Surgeon General

Addiction a Chronic Disease of the Brain, Not a Character Flaw: Surgeon General
Many people still see addiction as a character flaw instead of a chronic disease of the brain, according to U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. He told The Huffington Post that to address the opioid epidemic, it is necessary to “change how our country sees addiction.” Almost two million Americans are addicted to prescription opioids, Dr. Murthy told the publication’s Editor-in-Chief Arianna Huffington. “We can work on sharpening our prescribing practices, working with clinicians to ensure we’re treating pain safely and effectively,” he said. Doctors need to be more equipped with skills for “how to recognize and treat substance use disorders to ensure that all the needs of a patient population are cared for.”
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Stanford Medical School Takes Lead in Teaching Addiction Medicine

Stanford Medical School Takes Lead in Teaching Addiction Medicine
While most medical schools devote little time to teaching addiction medicine, Stanford is leading the way in taking a new approach, NPR reports. Stanford has announced addiction lectures will no longer be part of a psychiatry series, but will become a separate unit for doctors in all subspecialties. Training in addiction medicine will continue when students have clinical rotations. As part of the school’s effort to reduce doctors’ reliance on prescribing opioids for pain, Stanford professor Dr. Anna Lembke is working with fellow faculty members to offer a lecture series on alternative treatments, such as acupuncture and massage.
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States That Have Not Expanded Medicaid Struggle to Get Care to Addiction Patients

States That Have Not Expanded Medicaid Struggle to Get Care to Addiction Patients
In the 19 states that have not expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, doctors, public health officials and community leaders are struggling to get care to patients who need addiction treatment, the Los Angeles Times reports. Many poor patients in these states are on waiting lists for recovery programs, or cannot obtain medicine to treat their addiction because they can’t afford it, health officials say. In states that expanded their Medicaid programs through the Affordable Care Act, poor adults have access to health insurance and a way to pay for addiction treatment, the article notes. The 19 states that have rejected federal aid to expand Medicaid eligibility have effectively made coverage available only to poor children, seniors and pregnant women. All of those states have Republican governors or legislatures. “The best way to get treatment if you’re addicted to drugs in Missouri is to get pregnant,” said Dr. Joe...
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