Geoffrey P. Kane, MD, MPH is Chief of AddictionServices at the Brattleboro Retreat, a 180-year-old psychiatric and addiction treatment hospital in southeastern Vermont. He is a graduate of Boston College and Yale School of Medicine and trained in internal medicine and social medicine at Montefiore Medical Center. His Master of Public Health degree ...is also from Yale. Dr. Kane is certified by the American Boards of Internal Medicine and Addiction Medicine and was named a Fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine the first year that honor was available. He has taught at Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Antioch University New England, New Hampshire Technical Institute, and Albany Medical College. His book Inner-City Alcoholism (Human Sciences Press, 1981) was recommended by faculty at the Rutgers School of Alcohol Studies for its lucid discussion of alcoholism as a disease. Dr. Kane is Editor and a regular ontributor to the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Addiction Medicine Updates on www. ncadd.org. He is also the current Chair of that body's Medical-Scientific Committee More

Have You Ever Stepped on a Nail?

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Ask people if they’ve ever stepped on a nail and most will say yes. It can happen to anyone, although the odds go up when lots of boards with nails in them are lying around and people are not paying attention. No one wants or expects to step on a nail. It’s a no-fault wound. Addiction is more likely to develop when lots of addictive substances are within easy reach and people are not paying attention. Some people are more susceptible than others, but it can happen to anyone. No one wants or expects to develop addiction. It’s another no-fault wound. Concern and individualized assistance are appropriate responses to no-fault wounds. Blame and judgment are not. Our responses to people with addiction ought to be like our responses to people who step on a nail. We might begin by expressing concern for the injured person and then proceed to administer the...
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Fuel the Recovery of Others—with Acceptance and Accountability

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After looking the other way for far too long, people and institutions in the United States are starting to face addiction. Respect for individuals in active addiction and resources to assist them into recovery are gradually becoming the norm. Previous Addiction Medicine Updates have identified two core responsibilities, stated as calls to action, that most individuals in active addiction need to adopt in order to achieve lasting recovery. Keep Your Distance! advocates modifying routines and lifestyles to minimize the risk of resuming substance use. Ask for Help! advocates repairing and creating relationships based on honesty and mutual respect. The latest neuroscience, as well as decades of practical experience, support the relevance of these actions, which I call The Two Pillars of Recovery ®. But what about everyone else? What about all those who live with, care for, and work beside people in active addiction? What actions should family, friends, healthcare providers,...
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All About Medications for Opioid Use Disorder—In One Place

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In the face of our national opioid crisis communities across the United States are taking notice and taking action. They’re proactively addressing opioid misuse, opioid addiction, and overdose deaths by distributing naloxone nasal injectors to counteract overdoses, contriving ways to move individuals treated for overdoses directly into treatment, and making treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD) more accessible. Treatment for OUD has several potential components, one of which is use of three FDA-approved OUD medications: Methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone. Use of medication to treat opioid addiction has been controversial since the 1960s when methadone was first shown to help individuals addicted to heroin. But controversy is being replaced with acceptance as OUD medications are increasingly recognized as a potent tool to combat the opioid crisis. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 63 released by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) in February 2018, Medications for Opioid Use Disorder, is an...
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It’s Not the Rehab—It’s the Relationships!

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Individuals in active addiction sometimes say, “I don’t need another rehab, I could teach those groups.” Outpatient counselors sometimes say, “So-and-so isn’t doing well: S/he needs to go to rehab.” The first position discounts the value of addiction rehabilitation by equating it with the content of psychoeducational groups. The second elevates its value to that of a panacea for faltering recoveries. Rehabs—and, for that matter, outpatient addiction treatment programs that incorporate similar elements—are neither of these. Research has consistently shown that psychoeducation provides little or no benefit to those seeking addiction recovery. But interpersonal connection, such as an alliance with an empathic therapist, provides even more benefit than the actual method of treatment employed by the therapist. The wisdom of spirituality as well as the findings of science indicate that the way of recovery is not alone. Essential tasks for those seeking addiction recovery are to make sufficient lifestyle changes that...
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In Ontario, Individuals with Alcoholic Liver Disease Will Not Have to Wait Six Months for Liver Transplants

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Ethical principles stand behind healthcare providers who withhold medical treatments that are “futile or pointless.” But withholding treatment can be controversial. For example, the family of a gravely ill patient might not agree with professionals that an unproven treatment is futile. Even when scientific evidence in favor of a treatment accumulates, medical practitioners can be slow to embrace it. In Ontario, Canada, Debra Selkirk combined scientific reports with her powerful personal story, seeking to overturn the rule that individuals with advanced alcoholic liver disease must demonstrate six months of abstinence from alcohol to be eligible for a liver transplant. Debra shares her account of that process below. Mark Selkirk died on November 24, 2010 from liver failure caused by alcohol use disorder.  He was never assessed for a liver transplant because he had not been alcohol-free for 6 months, a restriction placed on alcoholic liver disease patients (ALD) around the world. The...
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“It all comes down to your choices.”

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“It all comes down to your choices,” said a man in his fifties as he completed treatment following a brief return to drinking lots of alcohol. In the company of supportive peers and an empathic treatment team, this man had immersed himself for three weeks in mindfulness practices structured by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). He also maintained connections with his sponsor and Alcoholics Anonymous. The man recounted how an offer of alcohol—made amid physical, interpersonal, and financial stressors—precipitated his most recent drinking episode. Similar situations had instigated previous binges. In the future, he plans to minimize exposure to stressors and drinking opportunities. When stressors or alcohol are unavoidable, he anticipates choosing to notice them without reacting in ways that conflict with his values. “Personal responsibility” for “choices” protects his paramount value, sobriety. Such clarity is too rare. Many others with addiction—and people around them—would do well to adopt this perspective....
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Prescription for the Nation

Prescription for the Nation
Most healthcare professionals promote the well-being of one individual at a time. Those who work in public health, however, promote the well-being of groups of individuals. The U.S. Public Health Service and the rest of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) promote the well-being of overlapping groups that taken altogether represent the entire population of the United States. Individuals do not always collaborate with healthcare providers. For example, only about 50 percent of patients with chronic diseases take their medications as prescribed. It remains to be seen whether the population of the United States will collaborate with HHS’s current initiative to protect the well-being of the Nation. In November 2016, HHS released FACING ADDICTION IN AMERICA: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health . Reports from the Surgeon General are not routine government publications. They address serious threats to the health of the population (e.g., HIV/AIDS)...
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ADHD—Focus on Adults

ADHD—Focus on Adults
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a condition characterized by inattention, disorganization, and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that consistently disrupt a person’s activities and relationships. According to DSM-5 (p 32), “Inattention and disorganization entail inabil­ity to stay on task, seeming not to listen, and losing materials, at levels that are inconsistent with age or developmental level. Hyperactivity-impulsivity entails overactivity, fidgeting, in­ability to stay seated, intruding into other people's activities, and inability to wait—symptoms that are excessive for age or developmental level.” This conception of ADHD is relatively new, although literature of the past 200 years depicts individuals who might meet current criteria for ADHD. In 1844, for example, German psychiatrist Heinrich Hoffman created a children’s story about Fidgety Phil (“Zappelphilipp”). In 1902, English pediatrician George Still described children with an “exaggeration of excitability” whose behavior was so disruptive that he considered them to have a defect of moral control. In 1937, Rhode Island physician...
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Hope & Caution – for Happy Holidays

Hope & Caution – for Happy Holidays
Once again, the holiday season is upon us.  The Addiction Medicine Update, Hope & Caution—for Happy Holidays,  originally published in November 2012, receives thousands of views, telling us that it strikes a chord in readers.  With that in mind, we are reprinting it this year.  As we approach the holiday season—the time of year from Thanksgiving through New Years when "joy" is the word but not necessarily the reality—it's worth reflecting on ways we can protect ourselves and those we care about from inconvenience and tragedy due to use of alcohol or other mood-changing substances. Start by believing that some measure of holiday joy and fulfillment, provided we are open to it, is available to us all.  Caution is needed. But the holidays evoke strong feelings, and strong feelings often override caution. Strong feelings could include the stress of keeping up with the seasonal parade of expectations and events such as...
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Nicotine Vapor Now Regulated with Tobacco

Nicotine Vapor Now Regulated with Tobacco
Efforts to create electronic cigarettes date from the 1930s. The first commercially successful devices were produced in China in 2003. Electronic cigarettes were introduced to Europe in 2006 and America in 2007. In the United States, regulation of these and similar products became much more stringent in 2016. The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act became law June 22, 2009, and gave the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory authority over the manufacture, distribution, and marketing of tobacco products. The FDA has deemed electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) to be tobacco products and issued regulations that affect not only electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) but also other devices that produce an inhalable cloud containing atomized nicotine. Initial stipulations took effect August 8, 2016. Additional requirements are scheduled for 2018. Some ENDS resemble conventional means for smoking tobacco, such as e-cigarettes, e-cigars, electronic pipes, and electronic waterpipes. There are also hand-held...
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Facing Addiction and The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence (NCADD) are proud to announce the merger of our organizations – creating a national leader in turning the tide on the addiction epidemic.
The merged organization will be called:

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